Resource 

Teaching Healthcare Students How to Think Sociologically

Abstract:

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This in-class activity and assignment builds on Adam’s (2010) exercise on the differences between sociological and non-sociological explanations for human behavior but with a focus on healthcare students. As sociology becomes increasingly integrated into the curriculum of healthcare education, it is important to develop strategies for teaching the relevance of sociology for the future careers of healthcare students. Healthcare students are already familiar with the general concept of medication adherence; however, they have most likely not been encouraged to consider the behavior from a sociological perspective. This activity asks students to generate sociological and nonsociological explanations for medication-taking behaviors and to consider the implications of these explanations for their future interactions with patients.

Details:

Resource Type(s):
Assignment, Class Activity 
Author(s):
Danielle M Giffort 
Date Published:
2/5/2016 
Subject Area:
Introduction to Sociology/Social Problems 
Class Level:
College 100 
Class Size:
Any 
Language:
English 


Usage Notes:

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This in-class exercise and accompanying assignment was designed for healthcare students (specifically pharmacy students) who are taking Introduction to Sociology. Ideally, the in-class activity and assignment take place during the first week of the semester when students learn about the sociological imagination. The assignment could also be used in an...

Learning Goals and Assessments:

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Goal 1:
To help healthcare students recognize the difference between sociological and non-sociological explanations for human behavior using the example of medication adherence.
Assessment 1:
Students will complete a written assignment based on an in-class activity to assess their understanding of the material.

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Thinking Sociologically about Medication Adherence.pdf
citation.docx